Archive for the ‘Tei Explains It’ Category

Tei Explains It: August Rater Updates

Monday, August 26th, 2013

Continue to stay up-to-date on the latest rater news and announcements.

NATE/RESNET HVAC Performance Verifier Exam

NATE is beta testing the NATE/RESNET HVAC Performance Verifier exam in July and August, 2013. Beta testing is done to make sure we have the right questions, we have the right approach and to receive industry input into the development. The beta exam is now available for HERS raters to take.

Several weeks ago, HERS raters were sent an invitation to take the NATE/RESNET exam at FSEC.  The response on the registration page was great however the majority of those that signed up did not show up for the exam.  In the future, if you will not be attending a class, test, etc that you have signed up in the FSEC store, please drop us an e-mail or call to cancel.  This has been pretty disappointing since there was no cost for this exam.

The next exam is available on August 30 starting at 9:00 AM at FSEC. Registration is available  at https://secure.fsec.ucf.edu/fsecstore/do/product/BldgExams/NATEexam

Rater Agreements

The EnergyGauge Office has been working on a HERS Rater packet.  This packet should be going out in the early fall. This packet will contain specifics in what we expect from raters and what you can expect from the EnergyGauge Office.  Please look for it in your mailboxes.  You will have 30 days to execute the agreement after receipt.

Quality Assurance

Quality Assurance for the 2013 year is in full swing.  I will be contacting you via e-mail and/or phone to schedule dates and times to get this done.  I have complete confidence that you will cooperate fully with this process.  Unfortunately, even if  you do one home, I will have to get into that home.  RESNET is enforcing this and if you do not respond the only choice that I have will be to suspend you from registering ratings.  We will be adopting a formal policy regarding this situation and others concerning QA and will be included in your rater packet which should be going out to all HERS raters in the early fall.

Combustion Classes

You will have until January 1, 2015 to complete the combustion portion of your individual certifications.  I know we have cancelled classes in the past because the exam was not ready.  The exam is now ready and the fall class scheduled for November 19-21 will be held. Register at https://secure.fsec.ucf.edu/fsecstore/do/product/BLDG/Combust

Tei Explains It: Quality Assurance

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

It is very important for a builders, superintendents and agents to understand the significance of field quality assurance (QA).  The process on the outside may sound threatening, but it really is a very simple process.  Failure to comply with QA may result in losing your ability to register ratings and ultimately the revocation of your certification.

Question: Is field quality assurance mandatory?

Field quality assurance is not voluntary. It is mandatory requirement by RESNET Standards.

Question: Who must have quality assurance performed?

If you are an Energy Rater and do ratings, then you must have field quality assurance performed on at least one home a year if you perform 1 – 100 ratings.  If you perform ratings on 101 homes in a year, you must have 2 homes quality assured.  RESNET Standards require 1% of your annual total of ratings to have a field quality assurance visit.  Unfortunately, the Standard rounds up to an additional field QA at one not fifty and therefore 202 ratings will result in 3 field reviews.

Your files which come in for registration is also quality assured.  One in ten homes go through a quality assurance process which helps to instill confidence in every rater’s file.  So remember, when you create the file and it has any comments, mistakes or rejections, they reflect on your ability because you are the rater of record.  These are also reported to RESNET on an annual basis.

Question: Who should be informed of these visits?

Everyone! Please inform your builders, clients and your client’s agents that quality assurance is not a voluntary requirement. It is mandatory by RESNET Standards.  In this case, cooperation is essential.  Failure of your builder, client or your client’s agent to cooperate in quality assurance will result in the denial of rating registrations by that particular builder.  The Standard applies to all regardless of what Program, if any, they are participating in.  Also highly recommend upon soliciting a new client you make sure that they understand this process and that all their agents understand so there is less confusion on the field when quality assurance is performed.  You can go as far as having them sign that they acknowledge and understand the process and this may occur at any time with any of their homes.  We strive to make this as painless as possible by soliciting your cooperation so the process is smooth and does not create any undue hardship on the part of your client.  We are able to schedule in the evenings as well as the weekend if necessary.  Again, our aim is to get this done as painless as possible, with as little discomfort as possible.

So remember to make sure your client understands and agrees to quality assurance!

Tei Explains It: Rater Role & Responsibility

Wednesday, March 27th, 2013

Question: What are my roles and responsibilities as a rater?

You are a rater.  It doesn’t matter what classification. You are considered a third party verifier of energy efficiency of real property.  Decisions made about this property regarding energy efficiency are basically “in your hands”.  Your input to the client, whether it be a builder or homeowner, is important for solid, sound decisions about spending money wisely on replacement or upgrading systems and materials.  Your opinions should be based on solid principles as well as keeping in mind the “law of diminishing returns.”

As a rater, your only responsibility is to your client.  Remember that as a rater you are the person who is certified.  You are the person who passed all of the exams and jumped through all of the hoops.  When you perform a rating, you are putting your reputation on the line as well as the whole energy efficiency industry.  When you perform a rating you are NOT really representing the company you are paid by because companies are not certified.  At this point you are a third party verifier and the client is your only concern.  If you allow any person or circumstance to change your professional judgment you are not being a third party verifier.  You are being a paid “yes” man/woman.  This can cause problems in the future if there is a complaint because defending yourself in a “compromising” situation can be detrimental to you not your employer or client.  You are actually putting your certification in jeopardy, not to mention eroding the integrity of the rating system.

Please make sure you explain to your employer that you represent the rating industry as a third party verifier when you perform a rating, and your job is to verify the features of the home as well as assist with sound, solid advice when asked to do so.  Selling or advising a client to purchase a material or service from your company is fine as long as you can justify its cost through its savings.  If asked to compromise your advice based on what the company sells is a red flag warning. Remember your certification is yours, and will be taken from you, not the company you are employed through.  Trying to “please” your builder because your employer “expects” it also becomes another red flag warning.  Again, remember whose certification is on the line.

So, the next time you hit the road to perform a rating, remember that you are representing yourself as a third party verifier as well as an entire energy efficiency community.  Please take pride in what you do and all of those you represent.

Tei Explains It: Rater Class Distinction in Florida

Friday, March 1st, 2013

Question: Is there a rater class distinction in Florida?

The answer is YES! Only in Florida are there 3 distinct classifications of energy raters – Class 3, Class 2 and Class 1.

Let’s review these three classification as well as requirements for each.

Class 3

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Class 3 ratings are ratings based on construction documents. A Class 3 Rater is only recognized in Florida and can only rate buildings from these construction documents alone. A Class 3 Rater is not recognized nationally by RESNET and can only perform ratings in the State of Florida.

A Class 3 Rater must obtain 12 CEU’s (Continuing Education Units) every three years. Currently these CEU’s do not have to be registered with the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation (DBPR) and allow the rater to get short trainings from suppliers of construction materials and processes as long as the courses are related to “green building”, construction materials, HVAC equipment, insulation, ventilation, IAQ and energy efficiency.

Class 2

Class 2 ratings are based on a site audit. A Class 2 Rater measures the windows, walls, floors, ceiling and doors. The equipment and systems in the home are documented by make and model number and all are documented by photographs which become essential if there is a problem. A Class 2 Rater, like the Class 3 Rater, is not recognized nationally by RESNET and can only perform ratings in the State of Florida.

A Class 2 Rater must obtain 12 CEU’s every three years similar to the Class 3 Rater. Currently these CEU’s do not have to be registered with DBPR and allow the rater to get short trainings from suppliers of construction materials and processes as long as the courses are related to “green building”, construction materials, HVAC equipment, insulation, ventilation, IAQ and energy efficiency.

Class 1

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Class 1 ratings are based on the site audit and include a building airtightness test as well as a duct leakage total test and duct leakage to outside test. A Class 1 Rater is the only one recognized nationally by RESNET and are allowed to perform ratings in every state except for California.

A Class 1 Rater can register the coveted tax credits for qualifying homes and are also eligible to register and certify homes for EPA’s Energy Star Version 3.0 (with special training) and DOE’s Challenge Home.

A Class 1 Rater is required to obtain 18 PDU’s (Professional Development Units) in three (3) years. These PDU’s can be obtained in three different ways.

  1. Attend a RESNET Conference and obtain 18 PDU’s by documentation of sessions to equal 18 hours. You can also attend the EEBA and ACI Conferences making sure that the tracks you attend are approved by RESNET
  2. Re-take the RESNET Core Exam and pass with at least 80%
  3. Take RESNET approved classes to obtain PDU’s

It is required that all raters regardless of classification will take a recertification test every three (3) years to retain their certification. At that time they will take a Recertification class and exams relevant to their classification. A Class 1 Rater will also show proficiency by performing a blower door and duct leakage test total and duct leakage test outside.

Questions regarding rater class distinction, contact Tei Kucharski.